Physics Course List 2016-2017

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PHYSCI 2 - Mechanics, Elasticity, Fluids, and Diffusion
(122575 – Section 001)  
Logan S. McCarty
Fall 2016

Description: An introduction to classical mechanics, with special emphasis on the motion of organisms in fluids. Topics covered include: kinematics, Newton's laws of motion, oscillations, elasticity, random walks, diffusion, and fluids. Examples and problem set questions will be drawn from the life sciences and medicine.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physical Sciences 1 (or Chemistry 7), Mathematics 1b, or the equivalent.

PHYSCI 3 - Electromagnetism, Circuits, Waves, Optics, and Imaging
(122576 – Section 001)  
Louis Deslauriers and Gregory Kestin
Spring 2017

Description: This course is an introduction to electromagnetism, digital information, waves, optics and sound. Topics covered include: electric and magnetic fields, electrical potential, circuits, simple digital circuits, wave propagation in various media, microscopy, sound and hearing. The course will draw upon a variety of applications to the biological sciences and will use real-world examples to illustrate many of the physical principles described. There are six laboratories.
Credits:
4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physical Sciences 2 (or Physics 1a or 11a), Mathematics 1b, or equivalent.

PHYSCI 12A - Mechanics from an Analytic, Numerical and Experimental Perspective
(109274 – Section 001)  
Christopher Stubbs
Spring 2017

Description: This is the first term of a two-semester introductory physical science and engineering course sequence. The focus is on quantitative scientific reasoning, with the first term's exploration framed in the context of basic mechanics. Students will gain competence in both analytic (using pencil, paper and single-variable calculus) and numerical (using computer modeling) approaches to modeling simple physical systems and for the analysis of experimental data. Topics include kinematics, linear and rotational motion, forces, energy, collisions, gravitation, simple fluids and a brief introduction to waves. Examples are drawn from across the physical sciences and engineering. The course is aimed at first year students who have an interest in pursuing a concentration in the sciences and/or engineering. The course structure includes lecture, discussion and laboratory components.
Credits: 4

PHYSICS 12B - Electromagnetism and Statistical Physics from an Analytic, Numerical and Experimental Perspective
(109457 – Section 001)  
Melissa Franklin and Anna Klales
Fall 2016

Description: This is the second term of a two-semester introductory sequence that uses a combination of analytic and numerical methods to understand physical systems, to analyze experimental data, and to compare data to models. Topics include electrostatics and magnetostatics, electromagnetic fields, optics [all topics illustrated with applications to current technological and societal challenges], and an introduction to the physics of many-body systems and their aggregate properties such as entropy, temperature and pressure. The course is aimed at second year students who have an interest in pursuing a concentration in the sciences and/or engineering. The course structure includes lecture, discussion and laboratory components.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physical Sciences 12a

PHYSICS 15A - Introductory Mechanics and Relativity
(111164 – Section 001)  
David J. Morin, Amir Yacoby, Carey Witkov and Keith Zengel (Fall 2016)
Jenny Hoffman (Spring 2017)
Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017

Description: Newtonian mechanics and special relativity. Topics include vectors; kinematics in three dimensions; Newton's laws; force, work, power; conservative forces, potential energy; momentum, collisions; rotational motion, angular momentum, torque; static equilibrium, oscillations, simple harmonic motions; gravitation, planetary motion; fluids; special relativity.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Mathematics preparation at least at the level of Mathematics 1b concurrently is required. However, some elementary ideas from multivariable calculus may be used and students are encouraged to take Mathematics 21a concurrently.

PHYSICS 15B - Introductory Electromagnetism and Statistical Physics
(111896 – Section 001)  
Philip Kim, Carey Witkov and Keith Zengel (Fall 2016)
David J. Morin and Amir Yacoby (Spring 2017)
Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017

Description: Electricity and magnetism. Topics include electrostatics, electric currents, magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, Maxwell?s equations, electromagnetic radiation, magnetic fields in materials, and some basic notions in kinetic theory, entropy, temperature, and phase transition associated with electricity and magnetism.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 15a, Physics 16, or written permission of the Head Tutor in Physics. Mathematics preparation at least at the level of Mathematics 21a taken concurrently is required. Vector calculus, (div, grad and curl) are used extensively--in principle, this is taught in the course. Students taking Mathematics 21a concurrently will likely find that some concepts are introduced in Physics 15b before they have seen them in Mathematics 21a. Some students may wish to postpone Physics 15b until they have completed Mathematics 21a.

PHYSICS 15C - Wave Phenomena
(124154 – Section 001)  
Girma Hailu and Markus Greiner (Fall 2016)
Cora Dvorkin and Mara Prentiss (Spring 2017)
Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017

Description: Forced oscillation and resonance; coupled oscillators and normal modes; Fourier series; Electromagnetic waves, radiation, longitudinal oscillations, sound; traveling waves; signals, wave packets and group velocity; two- and three-dimensional waves; polarization; geometrical and physical optics; interference and diffraction. Optional topics: Water waves, holography, x-ray crystallography, solitons, music, quantum mechanics, and waves in the early universe.
Credits:
4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 15a, Physics 15b, or written permission of the Head Tutor in Physics. Mathematics preparation at least at the level of Mathematics 21b taken concurrently is required. Some prior knowledge of complex numbers (for example as taught in Mathematics 1b) is helpful. Linear algebra and differential equations are used extensively. Students taking Mathematics 21b concurrently will likely find that some concepts are introduced in Physics 15c before they have seen them in Mathematics 21b. Some students may wish to postpone Physics 15c until they have completed Mathematics 21b.

PHYSICS 16 - Mechanics and Special Relativity
(111197 – Section 001)  
Howard Georgi, Carey Witkov and Keith Zengel
Fall 2016

Description: Newtonian mechanics and special relativity for students with good preparation in physics and mathematics at the level of the advanced placement curriculum. Topics include oscillators damped and driven and resonance (how to rock your car out of a snow bank or use a swing), an introduction to Lagrangian mechanics and optimization, symmetries and Noether's theorem, special relativity, collisions and scattering, rotational motion, angular momentum, torque, the moment of inertia tensor (dynamic balance), gravitation, planetary motion, and a quantitative introduction to some of the mind-bending ideas of modern cosmology like inflation and dark energy.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Score of 5 on the mechanics section of the Physics C Advanced Placement exam, or equivalent. Mathematics preparation at least at the level of Mathematics 21a taken concurrently is required. Thorough knowledge of calculus of one variable and vectors plus some mathematical sophistication. The mathematical level will be significantly higher than that of Physics 15a. If in doubt, check the Canvas site ahead of time, or email the professor at hgeorgi@fas.harvard.edu, or just shop.

PHYSICS 90R - Supervised Research
(111672 – Section 001)  
David J. Morin
Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017

Description: Primarily for selected concentrators in Physics, or in Chemistry and Physics, who have obtained honor grades in Physics 15 and a number of intermediate-level courses. The student must be accepted by some member of the faculty doing research in the student's field of interest. The form of the research depends on the student's interest and experience, the nature of the particular field of physics, and facilities and support available. Students wishing to write a senior thesis can do so by arranging for a sponsor and enrolling in this course.

Credits: 4

PHYSICS 91R - Supervised Reading Course for Undergraduates
(110569 – Section 001)  
David J. Morin
Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017

Description: Open to selected concentrators in Physics, Chemistry and Physics, and other fields who wish to do supervised reading and studying of special topics in physics. Ordinarily such topics do not include those covered in a regular course of the Department. Honor grades in Physics 15 and a number of intermediate-level courses are ordinarily required. The student must be accepted by a member of the faculty.

Credits: 4

PHYSICS 95 - Topics in Current Research
(111967 – Section 001)  
Masahiro Morii and Christopher Stubbs
Fall 2016-2017

Description: The goal of this tutorial is twofold. First, students will learn about a range of modern physics research topics from experts at Harvard as well as from one another. Every Wednesday evening a faculty member speaks on his/her area of research, preceded by assigned reading and a student presentation designed to introduce the basic physics, as well as important developments and burning problems at the frontiers of that particular research area. Second, the tutorial provides structured activities to help students develop practical skills for their future careers, expanding knowledge on unfamiliar subjects, participating in discussions, presenting and writing clearly about complex topics, and engaging in self and peer evaluation.
Credits: 4

PHYSICS 123 - Laboratory Electronics
(124108)
Thomas Hayes and Bradley Hubbard-Nelson (Fall 2016, section 001)
Thomas Hayes and Bradley Hubbard-Nelson (Fall 2016, section 002)
Thomas Hayes, Michael Hegg, and Erika McDonald (Spring 2017, section 001)
Thomas Hayes, Michael Hegg, Erika McDonald and Michael Burke (Spring 2017, section 002)
Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017

Description: A lab-intensive introduction to electronic circuit design. Develops circuit intuition and debugging skills through daily hands-on lab exercises, each preceded by class discussion, with minimal use of mathematics and physics. Moves quickly from passive circuits, to discrete transistors, then concentrates on operational amplifiers, used to make a variety of circuits including integrators, oscillators, regulators, and filters. The digital half of the course treats analog-digital interfacing, emphasizes the use of microcontrollers and programmable logic devices (PLDs).
Credits: 4

PHYSICS 125 - Physics for Future Presidential Advisors
(120167 – Section 001)  
John Doyle
Fall 2016-2017

Description: Uses physics to analyze important technologies and real world systems. Stresses estimation and ?back of the envelope? calculations, as are commonly used by research physicists when addressing new problems and analyzing national and international policy issues. New physical concepts are introduced as necessary. Example topics: energy production and storage (solar, nuclear, batteries), nuclear physics, power and weapons, airplanes, spy satellites, rockets, fluids, health effects of radiation, risk analysis, mechanical design and failure, communication, computation, global warming.  Emphasis is on developing physical intuition and the ability to do order-of-magnitude calculations.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 15a, b, c, and mathematics at the level of Mathematics 21a. Physics 143a and 181 are very helpful, and may be taken concurrently.

PHYSICS 129 - Energy Science
(125656 – Section 001)  
Lene Hau
Spring 2017

Description: Non-fossil energy sources and energy storage are important for our future. We cover four main subjects to which students with a background in physics and physical chemistry could make paradigm changing contributions: photovoltaic cells, nuclear power, batteries, and photosynthesis. Fundamentals of electrodynamics, statistical/thermal physics, and quantum mechanics are taught as needed to give students an understanding of the topics covered.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 15a (or 16), 15b,c or 11a,b. Pre/co-requisite Physics 143a or Chemistry 160 or equivalent.

PHYSICS 140 - Introduction to the Physics of Living Systems
(127814 – Section 001)  
Aravinthan Samuel
Spring 2017

Description: We will discuss how theoretical and experimental tools derived from physics - e.g., statistical mechanics, fluid mechanics - have been used to gain insight into molecular and cellular biology including the structure and regulation of DNA, genomes, proteins, the cytoskeleton, and the cell. Students will gain an intensive introduction to biological systems, as well as physical and mathematical modeling.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 15a,b,c.

PHYSICS 141 - The Physics of Sensory Systems in Biology
(121885 – Section 001)  
Aravinthan Samuel
Fall 2016-2017

Description: Living organisms use sensory systems to inform themselves of the sights, sounds, and smells of their surrounding environments. Sensory systems are physical measuring devices, and are therefore subject to certain limits imposed by physics. Here we will consider the physics of sensory measurement and perception, and study ways that biological systems have solved their underlying physical problems. We will discuss specific cases in vision, olfaction, and hearing from a physicist's point of view.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 11a, b or 15 a, b, required.

PHYSICS 143A - Quantum Mechanics I
(108465 – Section 001)  
Matthew Reece
Spring 2017

Description: Introduction to nonrelativistic quantum mechanics: uncertainty relations; Schrodinger equation; Dirac notation; matrix mechanics; one-dimensional problems including particle in box, tunneling, and harmonic oscillator; angular momentum, hydrogen atom, spin, Pauli principle; time-independent perturbation theory; scattering.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Linear algebra including matrix diagonalization; Physics 15c or written permission of the Head Tutor.

PHYSICS 143B - Quantum Mechanics II
(111731 – Section 001)  
Girma Hailu
Fall 2016-2017

Description: Introduction to path integrals, identical particles, many-electron theory, WKB approximation, time-dependent perturbation theory, scattering theory, and relativistic quantum mechanics.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 143a.

Location: Jefferson 356 (FAS)

PHYSICS 151 - Mechanics
(111231 – Section 001)  
Arthur Jaffe
Fall 2016-2017

Description: Fundamental ideas of classical mechanics including contact with modern work and applications. Topics include Lagrange's equations, the role of variational principles, symmetry and conservation laws, Hamilton's equations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory and phase space dynamics. Applications to celestial mechanics, quantum mechanics, the theory of small oscillations and classical fields, and nonlinear oscillations, including chaotic systems presented.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 15a, 15b or written permission of the Head Tutor; Mathematics 21a, b or equivalent.

PHYSICS 153 - Electrodynamics
(111822 – Section 001)  
Girma Hailu
Spring 2017

Description: Aimed at advanced undergraduates. Emphasis on the properties and sources of the electromagnetic fields and on the wave aspects of the fields. Course starts with electrostatics and subsequently develops the Maxwell equations. Topics: electrostatics, dielectrics, magnetostatics, electrodynamics, radiation, wave propagation in various media, wave optics, diffraction and interference. A number of applications of electrodynamics and optics in modern physics are discussed.
Credits:
4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 15a, b, and c, or written permission of the Head Tutor; Mathematics 21a, b or equivalent.

PHYSICS 175 - Laser Physics and Modern Optical Physics
(121941 – Section 001)  
Markus Greiner
Spring 2017

Description: Introduction to laser physics and modern optical physics aimed at advanced undergraduates. Review of electromagnetic theory and relevant aspects of quantum mechanics. Wave nature of light. Physics of basic optical elements. Propagation of focused beams, optical resonators, dielectric waveguides. Interaction of light with matter, introduction to quantum optics. Lasers. Physics of specific laser systems. Introduction to nonlinear optics. Modern applications.
Credits:
4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 15b, 15c, 143a, or permission of the instructor.

PHYSICS 181 - Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics
(143450 – Section 001)  
Ashvin Vishwanath
Spring 2017

Description: Introduction to thermal physics and statistical mechanics: basic concepts of thermodynamics (energy, heat, work, temperature, and entropy), classical and quantum ensembles and their origins, and distribution functions. Applications include the specific heat of solids, black body radiation; classical and quantum gases; magnetism; phase transitions; propagation of heat and sound.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 143a or equivalent.

PHYSICS 191 - Advanced Laboratory
(121993)  
Isaac F. Silvera and Ronald Walsworth (Fall 2016, section 002) 
Isaac F. Silvera and Robert Westervelt (Fall 2016, section 001L)
Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017

Description: Students carry out three experimental projects selected from those available representing condensed matter, atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Included are pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (with MRI), microwave spectroscopy, optical pumping, Raman scattering, scattering of laser light, nitrogen vacancies in diamond, neutron activation of radioactive isotopes, Compton scattering, relativistic mass of the electron, recoil free gamma-ray resonance, lifetime of the muon, studies of superfluid helium, positron annihilation, superconductivity, the quantum Hall effect, properties of semiconductors. The facilities of the laboratory include several computer controlled experiments as well as computers for analysis.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 15a or 16, 15b, 15c. Physics 143a is highly recommended.

PHYSICS 195 - Introduction to Solid State Physics
(112107 – Section 001)  
Eugene Demler
Fall 2016-2017

Description: The physics of crystalline solids and their electric, magnetic, optical, and thermal properties. Designed as a first course in solid-state physics. Topics: free electron model; Drude model; crystal structure and vibration (phonons); electrons in solids, Bloch theorem and band formation; metals and insulators; semiconductors and their applications; magnetism; electronic transport in low-dimensional systems.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Elementary quantum mechanics.

PHYSICS 201 - Data Analysis for Physicists
(161201 – Section 001)  
Vinothan Manoharan
Spring 2017

Description: This course covers what to do with experimental data after acquiring it. We will start with how to load, parse, filter, and visualize data using modern computational tools, then proceed to more advanced methods including Markov chain Monte Carlo and time-series analysis. Throughout, students will learn methods of statistical inference from both frequentist and Bayesian frameworks. Applications to particle physics, biophysics, condensed matter, applied physics, astrophysics, and more.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Research experience commensurate with that of a first-year (or higher) PhD student in experimental physics. Students without such experimental experience are recommended to take Physics 191r or Physics 247r (or equivalent) first.

PHYSICS 210 - General Theory of Relativity
(114266 – Section 001)  
Daniel Jafferis
Spring 2017

Description: An introduction to general relativity: the principle of equivalence, Riemannian geometry, Einstein's field equation, the Schwarzschild solution, the Newtonian limit, experimental tests, black holes.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 151 and 153, and Mathematics 21 or equivalents.

PHYSICS 211R - Topics in Cosmology and Particle Physics
(117201 – Section 001)     
Lisa Randall
Spring 2017

Description: This course will be about particle physics and cosmology, focusing on those aspects of cosmology most relevant to people studying particle model building and phenomenology. Topics will include inflation, dark matter, and dark energy. The course will be seminar style, with presentations by the lecturer and by students. The aim is to gear up for topics relevant to current research.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: General relativity at level of Physics 210 or equivalent. Physics 253a helpful, but not required.

PHYSICS 220 - Fluid Dynamics
(110144 – Section 001)  
Lakshminarayanan Mahadevan
Fall 2016-2017

Description: Continuum mechanics; conservation of mass and momentum, energy; stress, kinematics, and constitutive equations; vector and tensor calculus. Dimensional analysis and scaling. Navier-Stokes equations, Reynolds number. Solutions for simple flow states. Low Reynolds number flows; porous media flows; lubrication theory; gravity currents. Inviscid flows, Kelvin circulation theorem, Bernoulli integrals, Vortical flows. Waves in fluids; acoustics, shocks, water waves. Airfoil theory. Boundary layers. Flow instabilities. Mixing, and turbulence in unbounded and bounded flows.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Familiarity with dynamics, vectors, multivariable calculus, and partial differential equations. An undergraduate course in fluid dynamics or other continuum mechanics is strongly recommended.

PHYSICS 223 - Electronics for Scientists
(109346)
Thomas Hayes and Bradley Hubbard-Nelson (Fall 2016, Section 002)
Thomas Hayes, Michael Hegg, Erika McDonald and Michael Burke (Spring 2017, Section 001)
Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   

Description: An introduction to electronic circuit design intended to develop circuit intuition and debugging skills through daily design exercises, discussion and hands-on lab exercises. The approach is intensely practical, minimizing theory. Moves quickly from passive circuits to discrete transistors, then concentrates on operational amplifiers, used to make a variety of circuits including integrators, oscillators, regulators, and filters. The digital half of the course treats analog-digital interfacing, emphasizes the use of microcontrollers and programmable logic devices (PLDs).
Credits: 4

PHYSICS 223 - Electronics for Scientists
(109346 – Section 002)  
Thomas Hayes, Michael Hegg and Erika McDonald
Credits: 4
Spring 2017

PHYSICS 232 - Advanced Classical Electromagnetism
(112263 – Section 001)     
Jacob Barandes
Spring 2017

Description: Special relativity, relativistic field theories, gauge invariance, the Maxwell equations, conservation laws, time-independent phenomena, multipole expansions, electrodynamics and radiation theory, radiation from rapidly-moving accelerating charges, scattering and diffraction, and macroscopic averaged fields and propagation in matter. Additional topics may include relativistic particles with spin, coherent states, superconductors, accelerator physics, renormalization, and magnetic monopoles.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Prerequisites: Physics 153 and Physics 143a, or equivalent.

PHYSICS 247 - Laboratory Course in Contemporary Physics
(145024 – Section 001)  
Isaac F. Silvera and Robert Westervelt
Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017  

Description: Three experimental projects are selected representing condensed matter, atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Examples: experiments on pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance, microwave spectroscopy, optical tweezers, and non-linear optics, optical pumping, Raman scattering, scattering of laser light, nitrogen vacancies in diamond, neutron activation of radioactive isotopes, Compton scattering, relativistic mass of the electron, recoil free gamma-ray resonance, lifetime of the muon, studies of superfluid helium, positron annihilation, superconductivity, the quantum Hall effect, properties of semiconductors. The facilities of the laboratory include several computer controlled experiments as well as computers for analysis.
Credits: 4

PHYSICS 251A - Advanced Quantum Mechanics I
(111314 – Section 001)  
C. Vafa
Fall 2016-2017

Description: Basic course in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. Review of wave functions and the Schrodinger Equation; Hilbert space; the WKB approximation; central forces and angular momentum; electron spin; measurement theory; the density matrix; perturbation theory.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 143a, b or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

PHYSICS 251B - Advanced Quantum Mechanics II
(111876 – Section 001)  
Girma Hailu
Spring 2017

Description: Path integrals; identical particles and second quantization; time-dependent perturbations; quantized radiation field; absorption and emission of radiation; symmetry principles; the Dirac equation and the Dirac field; inelastic scattering.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 251a.

PHYSICS 253A - Quantum Field Theory I
(122930 – Section 001)  
Matthew D. Schwartz
Fall 2016-2017

Description: Introduction to relativistic quantum field theory. This course covers quantum electrodynamics. Topics include canonical quantization, Feynman diagrams, spinors, gauge invariance, path integrals, ultraviolet and infrared divergences, renormalization and applications to the quantum theory of the weak and gravitational forces.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 143a,b or equivalents.

PHYSICS 253B - Quantum Field Theory II
(115442 – Section 001)  
Matthew D. Schwartz
Spring 2017

Description: A continuation of Physics 253a. Topics include: the renormalization group, implications of unitarity, Yang-Mills theories, spontaneous symmetry breaking, weak interactions, anomalies, and quantum chromodynamics. Additional advanced topics may be covered depending on time and interest.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 253a.

PHYSICS 264 - Lie Algebras, Representations and Quantum Mechanics
(203512 – Section 001)  
Howard Georgi
Spring 2017

Description: Lie algebras and their representations are indispensible tools in quantummechanics. Starting from the operator treatment of angular momentum, thiscourse explores some of the (many) useful approaches to this subject withapplications in various areas of physics.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Some quantum mechanics beyond the level of Physics 143a.

PHYSICS 268R - Special Topics in Condensed Matter Physics. Quantum Many-Body Systems
(160744 – Section 001)    
Eugene Demler
Spring 2017

Description: This course will review field theory methods and Green's function approach to quantum many-body systems. Subjects discussed will include interacting electron systems, electron-phonon interaction and superconductivity, polarons, systems with dissipation, nonequilibrium phenomena and Keldysh Green's functions.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Applied Physics 295a or equivalent.

PHYSICS 271 - Topics in the Physics of Quantum Information
(121970 – Section 001)  
Mikhail Lukin
Fall 2016-2017

Description: Introduction to physics of quantum information, with emphasis on ideas and experiments ranging from quantum optics to condensed matter physics. Background and theoretical tools will be introduced. The format is a combination of lectures and class presentations.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Quantum mechanics at the level of introductory graduate courses.

PHYSICS 287A - Introduction to String Theory
(111191 – Section 001)  
Xi Yin
Fall 2016-2017

Description: Introduction to the perturbative formulation of string theories and dualities. Quantization of bosonic and superstrings, perturbative aspects of scattering amplitudes, supergravity, D-branes, T-duality and mirror symmetry. Also a brief overview of recent developments in string theory.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 253a, b or equivalent.

Location: Jefferson 453 (FAS)

PHYSICS 287BR - Topics in String Theory
(114008 – Section 001)  
Xi Yin
Spring 2017

Description: A selection of topics from current areas of research on string theory.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 287a.

PHYSICS 285A - Modern Atomic and Optical Physics I
(118734 – Section 001)  
Gerald Gabrielse
Fall 2016-2017

Description: Introduction to modern atomic physics. The fundamental concepts and modern experimental techniques will be introduced. Topics will include two-state systems, magnetic resonance, interaction of radiation with atoms, transition probabilities, spontaneous and stimulated emission, dressed atoms, trapping, laser cooling of ``two-level'' atoms, structure of simple atoms, fundamental symmetries, two-photon excitation, light scattering and selected experiments. The first of a two-term subject sequence that provides the foundations for contemporary research.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: One course in quantum mechanics (143a and b, or equivalent).

PHYSICS 289R - Euclidean Random Fields, Relativistic Quantum Fields and Positive Temperature
(118733 – Section 001)
Arthur Jaffe
Spring 2017

Description: The course will give the reconstruction of relativistic quantum fields from Euclidean fields as well as the relation between representations of the Poincare group to those of Euclidean group. Related topics are reflection positivity and Osterwalder-Schrader quantization, and supersymmetry, some of which will be covered.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 253a.

PHYSICS 295A - Introduction to Quantum Theory of Solids
(127980 – Section 001)
Bertrand Halperin
Spring 2017

Description: Electrical, optical, thermal, magnetic, and mechanical properties of solids will be treated based on an atomic scale picture and using the independent electron approximation. Metals, semiconductors, and insulators will be covered, with possible special topics such as superconductivity.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 181 and Applied Physics 195 or equivalent, and a graduate level quantum mechanics course similar to Physics 251a. (Physics 251b would be helpful and may be taken concurrently.)

PHYSICS 295B - Quantum Theory of Solids
(127979 – Section 001)  
Subir Sachdev
Fall 2016-2017

Description: Theory of the electron liquid. Fermi liquid theory. Feynman diagrams, path integrals, and fluctuation dissipation theorem. Collective modes and screening in the electron liquid. Ferromagnetism and anti ferromagnetism. Superconductivity: BCS and Landau-Ginzburg theories. Kondo models and mixed valence metals.
Credits: 4
Prerequisite(s): Recommended: Physics 251a, b, an introductory course in solid state physics, or permission of instructor.

PHYSICS 301A - Experimental Atomic and Elementary Particle Physics
(110965 – Section 001)
Gerald Gabrielse
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 301B - Experimental Atomic and Elementary Particle Physics
(110966 – Section 001)
Gerald Gabrielse
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 302 - Teaching and Communicating Physics
(107899 – Section 001S)
Jacob Barandes
Spring 2017

Description: Hands-on, experienced-based course for graduate students on teaching and communicating physics, conducted through practice, observation, feedback, and discussion. Departmental rules for teaching fellows, section and laboratory teaching, office hours, assignments, grading, and difficult classroom situations.
Credits: 4
Location: Science Ctr 102 (FAS)

PHYSICS 302 - Teaching and Communicating Physics
(107899 – Section 002S)
Jacob Barandes
Spring 2017

Description: Hands-on, experienced-based course for graduate students on teaching and communicating physics, conducted through practice, observation, feedback, and discussion. Departmental rules for teaching fellows, section and laboratory teaching, office hours, assignments, grading, and difficult classroom situations.
Credits: 4

PHYSICS 303A - Sensory and Behavioral Neuroscience
(118884 – Section 001)
Aravinthan Samuel
Credits: 16
Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
Credits: 16

PHYSICS 303B - Sensory and Behavioral Neuroscience
(118886 – Section 001)
Aravinthan Samuel
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 304A - Topics in Field Theory and String Theory
(110256 – Section 001)
Daniel Jafferis
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 304B - Topics in Field Theory and String Theory
(110257 – Section 001)
Daniel Jafferis
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 305A - Experimental High Energy Physics
(122762 – Section 001)
John Huth
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 305B - Experimental High Energy Physics
(123959 – Section 001)
John Huth
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 307A - Atomic/Bio-physics, Quantum Optics
(114638 – Section 001)
Lene Hau
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 307B - Atomic/Bio-physics, Quantum Optics
(114639 – Section 001)
Lene Hau
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 309A - Introduction to String Theory
(114009 – Section 001)
C. Vafa
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 309B - Topics in Elementary Particle Theory
(114014 – Section 001)
C. Vafa
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 311A - Experimental Atomic, Molecular, and Low-Energy Particle Physics
(148189 – Section 001)
John Doyle
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 311B - Experimental Atomic, Molecular, and Low-Energy Particle Physics
(143819 – Section 001)
John Doyle
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 313A - Experimental Condensed Matter Physics
(122839 – Section 001)
Amir Yacoby
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 313B - Experimental Condensed Matter Physics
(122840 – Section 001)
Amir Yacoby
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 315A - Topics in Theoretical Atomic, Molecular, and Condensed Matter Physics
(121332 – Section 001)
Eric Heller
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 315B - Topics in Theoretical Atomic, Molecular, and Condensed Matter Physics
(145282 – Section 001)
Eric Heller
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 317A - Topics in Biophysics
(119763 – Section 001)
Xiaowei Zhuang
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 317B - Topics in Biophysics
(119764 – Section 001)
Xiaowei Zhuang
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 319A - Topics in Experimental High Energy Physics
(113986 – Section 001)  
Melissa Franklin
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 319B - Topics in Experimental High Energy Physics
(113987 – Section 001)  
Melissa Franklin
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 321A - Experimental Soft Condensed Matter Physics
(112282 – Section 001)
David Weitz
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 321B - Experimental Soft Condensed Matter Physics
(112283 – Section 001)
David Weitz
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 323A - Topics in Condensed Matter Physics
(203753 – Section 001)  
Ashvin Vishwanath
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 323B - Topics in Condensed Matter Physics
(203754 – Section 001)  
Ashvin Vishwanath
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 327A - Topics in Condensed Matter Physics
(117548 – Section 001)  
David Nelson
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 327B - Topics in Condensed Matter Physics
(118814 – Section 001)  
David Nelson
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 329A - Condensed Matter and Statistical Theory
(143256 – Section 001)  
Bertrand Halperin
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 329B - Condensed Matter and Statistical Theory
(118337 – Section 001)  
Bertrand Halperin
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 331A - Topics in String Theory
(125320 – Section 001)  
Xi Yin
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 331B - Topics in String Theory
(125321 – Section 001)  
Xi Yin
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 333A - Experimental Atomic Physics
(112040 – Section 001)  
Mara Prentiss
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 333B - Experimental Atomic Physics
(112042 – Section 001)  
Mara Prentiss
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 335A - Topics in the History and Philosophy of Physics
(148180 – Section 001)  
Gerald Holton
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 335B - Topics in the History and Philosophy of Physics
(138414 – Section 001)  
Gerald Holton
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 337A - Topics in Experimental High Energy Physics
(114834 – Section 001)
Masahiro Morii

Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 337B - Topics in Experimental High Energy Physics
(114835 – Section 001)
Masahiro Morii

Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 339A - Condensed Matter and Atomic Physics
(120869 – Section 001)  
Subir Sachdev
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 339B - Condensed Matter and Atomic Physics
(120868 – Section 001)  
Subir Sachdev
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 341A - Topics in Experimental Atomic and Condensed Matter Physics
(111169 – Section 001)  
Markus Greiner
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 341B - Topics in Experimental Atomic and Condensed Matter Physics
(118950 – Section 001)  
Markus Greiner
Credits: 16


Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 343A - Observational Cosmology and Experimental Gravitation
(119051 – Section 001)  
Christopher Stubbs
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 343B - Observational Cosmology and Experimental Gravitation
(119052 – Section 001)  
Christopher Stubbs
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 345A - Experimental Gravitation: Radio and Radar Astronomy
(115102 – Section 001)  
Irwin Shapiro
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 345B - Experimental Gravitation: Radio and Radar Astronomy
(115113 – Section 001)  
Irwin Shapiro
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 347A - Topics in Quantum Optics
(115495 – Section 001)  
Mikhail Lukin
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 347B - Topics in Quantum Optics
(115525 – Section 001)  
Mikhail Lukin
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 349A - Topics in Theoretical Particle Physics
(125315 – Section 001)  
Matthew D. Schwartz
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 349B - Topics in Theoretical Particle Physics
(125316 – Section 001)  
Matthew D. Schwartz
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 351A - Experimental Soft Condensed Matter and Materials Physics
(120872 – Section 001)  
Vinothan Manoharan
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 351B - Experimental Soft Condensed Matter and Materials Physics
(120873 – Section 001)  
Vinothan Manoharan
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 353A - Topics in Statistical Physics and Quantitative Molecular Biology
(125788 – Section 001)  
Erel Levine
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 353B - Topics in Statistical Physics and Quantitative Molecular Biology
(125789 – Section 001)  
Erel Levine
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 355A - Theory of Elementary Particles
(110565 – Section 001)  
Roy Glauber
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 355B - Theory of Elementary Particles
(121811 – Section 001)  
Roy Glauber
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 357A - Experimental Condensed Matter Physics
(113916 – Section 001)  
Robert Westervelt
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   

Credits: 16

PHYSICS 357B - Experimental Condensed Matter Physics
(115410 – Section 001)  
Robert Westervelt
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 359A - Topics in Condensed Matter Physics
(115526 – Section 001)  
Eugene Demler
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 359B - Topics in Condensed Matter Physics
(115527 – Section 001)  
Eugene Demler
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017   
PHYSICS 361B - Topics in Experimental High Energy Physics
(125787 – Section 001)  
Credits: 16


Fall 2016
PHYSICS 363A - Topics in Condensed Matter Theory
(112091 – Section 001)  
Efthimios Kaxiras
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 363B - Topics in Condensed Matter Theory
(112092 – Section 001)  
Efthimios Kaxiras
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 365A - Topics in Mathematical Physics
(115341 – Section 001)  
Arthur Jaffe
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 365B - Topics in Mathematical Physics
(110837 – Section 001)  
Arthur Jaffe
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 369A - Experimental Condensed Matter: Synchrotron Radiation Studies
(110816 – Section 001)  
Peter S. Pershan
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 369B - Experimental Condensed Matter: Synchrotron Radiation Studies
(110817 – Section 001)  
Peter S. Pershan
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 371A - Topics in Experimental High Energy Physics
(111721 – Section 001)  
Gary Feldman
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 371B - Topics in Experimental High Energy Physics
(118633 – Section 001)  
Gary Feldman
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 373A - Historical and Philosophical Approaches to Modern and Contemporary Physics
(143237 – Section 001)  
Peter Galison
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 373B - Historical and Philosophical Approaches to Modern and Contemporary Physics
(143239 – Section 001)  
Peter Galison
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 377A - Theoretical High Energy Physics
(110740 – Section 001)  
Tai Wu
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 377B - Theoretical High Energy Physics
(111186 – Section 001)  
Tai Wu
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 379A - Topics in Elementary Particle Research and String Theory
(144344 – Section 001)  
Andrew Strominger
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 379B - Topics in Elementary Particle Research and String Theory
(148230 – Section 001)  
Andrew Strominger
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 381A - Experimental Condensed Matter Physics
(119765 – Section 001)  
Jenny Hoffman
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 381B - Experimental Condensed Matter Physics
(119766 – Section 001)  
Jenny Hoffman
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 383A - Low Temperature Physics of Quantum Fluids and Solids; Ultra High Pressure Physics
(113458 – Section 001)  
Isaac F. Silvera
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 383B - Low Temperature Physics of Quantum Fluids and Solids; Ultra High Pressure Physics
(113887 – Section 001)  
Isaac F. Silvera
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 385A - Topics in Biophysics
(117294 – Section 001)  
Howard Berg
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 385B - Topics in Biophysics
(117295 – Section 001)  
Howard Berg
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 387A - Applied Photonics
(116745 – Section 001)  
Eric Mazur
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 387B - Applied Photonics
(116755 – Section 001)  
Eric Mazur
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 389A - Topics in Field Theory: The Standard Model and Beyond
(116428 – Section 001)  
Lisa Randall
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 389B - Topics in Field Theory: The Standard Model and Beyond
(116429 – Section 001)  
Lisa Randall
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 391A - Experimental Atomic Physics, Biophysics, and Soft Matter Physics
(120134 – Section 001)  
Ronald Walsworth
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 391B - Experimental Atomic Physics, Biophysics, and Soft Matter Physics
(119076 – Section 001)  
Ronald Walsworth
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 393A - Topics in Elementary Particle Theory
(117710 – Section 001)  
Matthew Reece
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 393B - Topics in Elementary Particle Theory
(117913 – Section 001)  
Matthew Reece
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 395A - Topics in Theoretical High Energy/String Theory
(109287 – Section 001)  
Matthew Reece
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 395B - Topics in Theoretical High Energy/String Theory
(109288 – Section 001)  
Matthew Reece
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 397A - Experimental Condensed Matter Physics
(121228 – Section 001)  
Jene Golovchenko
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 397B - Experimental Condensed Matter Physics
(121229 – Section 001)  
Jene Golovchenko
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 399A - Topics in Cosmology
(160981 – Section 001)  
Cora Dvorkin
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017
PHYSICS 399B - Topics in Cosmology
(160982 – Section 001)  
Cora Dvorkin
Credits: 16

Fall 2016 &
Spring 2017