Recent News and Events

A showcase of projects from the Harvard section of the Fall '14 MIT course "How to Make (Almost) Anything" (February 3, 2015). Watch the slideshow.


Figure 1
Thermally induced electrical currents, known as Johnson noise, cause fluctuating electric and magnetic fields in proximity to a conductor. These fluctuations are intrinsically related to the conductivity of the metal...


Prof. Eugene Demler
Prof. Eugene Demler has been elected the recipient of a Carl Friedrich Siemens Research Award. This award is conferred in recognition of lifetime achievements in a science field, without any restrictions being placed on the choice of science discipline...


Eisenstein lecture announcement
The Sound waves propagating through the plasma of the Universe only 400,000 years after the Big Bang now offer some of our most precise measures of the composition and history of the Universe...


Fig. 1
The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect center in diamond has demonstrated great capability for nanoscale magnetic sensing and imaging for both static and periodically modulated target fields. However, it remains a challenge...


The physics Graduate Student Council (GSC) organized the Harvard Physics Research Poster Session with the intent of increasing inner-departmental communication between graduate students...



Mount Everest

On January 21, 2015, Willy Shih, Robert and Jane Cizik Professor of Management and Practice at the Harvard Business School, gave a leadership workshop to 30 of our Research Scholars. In teams of five, with each person assigned a specific role...



class projects
In this Wintersession class, students learned to make small soldered electronic circuits from copper-covered boards or copper film, either for their research or just for fun, using the Modela mill and the vinyl cutter...


Figure 2: Inner structure of the skyrmion in the (x, z) plane
Topological excitations keep fascinating physicists since many decades. While individual vortices and solitons emerge and have been observed in many areas of physics, their most intriguing higher dimensional topological relatives, skyrmions...


Figure 3: Protocol for quantum-enhanced nuclear spin imaging
Nuclear spin imaging at the atomic level is essential for the understanding of fundamental biological phenomena and for applications such as drug discovery. The advent of novel nanoscale sensors promises to achieve the long-standing goal of single-protein...


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