Recent News and Events

Try a quick experiment: Take two flashlights into a dark room and shine them so that their light beams cross. Notice anything peculiar? The rather anticlimactic answer is, probably not. That's because the individual photons that make up light do not interact...


FIgure onr from the article
Optical pulses from bichromatic lasers are used to control the temperature and motion of strontium monohydroxide molecules, a step towards trapping molecules...


lecture poster
Ever since the dawn of civilization we have been driven by a desire to know - to understand the physical world and probe the laws of nature. But are there limits to human knowledge? Are some things beyond the predictive powers of science...


Figure 2 from the article

A new unified theory of spin liquids offers insight into the relationship between magnetism and high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates...



Zhengwei Liu and Prof. Arthur Jaffe are leading a new project to expand quon, their pictorial math language developed to help understand quantum information theory, into new fields from algebra to M-theory.


Electrical confinement and manipulation of charge carriers in semiconducting nanostructures are essential for realizing functional quantum electronic devices. The unique band structure of atomically thin transition metal...


Prof. Gerald Gabrielse
It’s possible that no one knows the electron as well as physicist Gerald Gabrielse. He once held one in a trap for ten months to measure the size of its internal magnet. When it disappeared, he searched for two days before accepting that it was gone. “You get kind of fond of your particles after a while,” he says...


A newly developed microscope is providing scientists with a greatly enhanced tool to study how neurological disorders such as epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease affect neuron communication...


Programming a computer is generally a fairly arduous process, involving hours of coding, not to mention the laborious work of debugging, testing, and documenting to make sure it works properly...


Photo of Prof. Peter Galison
Prof. Peter Galison wins Abraham Pais Prize for History of Physics (APS) for his "outstanding contributions to the history of physics, especially for elucidating the complicated roles of experiment, instrumentation, and theory in the production of scientific knowledge, and for sharing his insights via award-winning scholarship, generous mentoring, and innovative filmmaking."


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